CLOSE X
Skip navigation Search

Matthew D. Taylor, Ph.D.

Protestant Scholar

h

Matthew D. Taylor, Ph.D., is the Protestant Scholar at ICJS, where he specializes in Muslim-Christian dialogue, Christian theology and interreligious engagement, religious politics in the U.S., and American Islam. Prior to coming to ICJS, Taylor served on the faculty of Georgetown University and The George Washington University, and he is currently a faculty member in the Theology Department at Loyola University Maryland. He is a member of the American Academy of Religion, the North American Association of Islamic and Muslim Studies, and the Company of Teachers of the Reformed Institute of Metropolitan Washington. Taylor holds a Ph.D. in Religious Pluralism and Muslim-Christian Relations from Georgetown University and an M.A. in Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary. His forthcoming book, American Scripturalism: The Parallel Lives of Salafi Muslims and Evangelical Christians (2022), offers an introduction to the oft-misunderstood Salafi movement in the U.S. by way of comparison with American Evangelicalism.

EXPERTISE 
  • Muslim-Christian Relations
  • Comparative Religion
  • Evangelicalism and Pentecostalism
  • Salafism in the U.S.
  • Christian Nationalism
  • Interreligious Encounter
SELECTED PUBLICATIONS 
Works in Progress 

 

Book, American Scripturalism: The Parallel Lives of Salafi Muslims and Evangelical Christians (anticipated 2022)

 

Article, “Between Saudi Authenticity and American Integration: AlMaghrib Institute and the International and Domestic Possibilities of Salafism”

 

Publications

 

“Can Salafis Become Democratic Innovators?” (under review) in forthcoming volume from the Christian-Muslim Studies Network Conference – anticipated 2021

 

Dabru Emet’s Imagined Future: Doing Eschatology with an Interreligious Sensitivity” (online forum) American Religion

 

Book Review: An American Biblical Orientalism: The Construction of Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Nineteenth-Century American Evangelical Piety by David D. Grafton for Dialog: A Journal of Theology (September 2020)

 

Book Review: Sacrifice in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam by David L. Weddle (NYU Press, 2017) for Reading Religion: A Publication of the American Academy of Religion (January 2019)

 

Book Review: Why I Am a Salafi by Michael Muhammad Knight (Soft Skull Press, 2015) for the American Journal of Islam and Society, Vol. 35, no. 2 (Spring 2018)

 

“A Cautionary Tale for Interreligious Studies from Comparative Fundamentalism: Who is at the Table?” in the Journal of Interreligious Studies, Issue 21 (October 2017)

 

SELECTED PRESENTATIONS

“Shofars and a Messianic Rabbi at the Capitol Riot? American Christian Nationalism’s Jewish Edge” at the American Academy of Religion, San Antonio, TX (November 2021)

 

“‘We are going to rule and reign through Trump and under the lordship of Jesus Christ’ – A Stereotype-defying, Immigrant, Christian Nationalist Pastor at the January DC Protests” at the American Academy of Religion, San Antonio, TX (November 2021)

 

“Between Saudi Authenticity and American Integration: Post-Salafi Shaykhs Straddle National and International Identities” at the British International Studies Association (June 2021)

 

“Reformed Theology’s Reasons for (and Hesitation about) Interreligious Dialogue” for The Reformed Institute of Metropolitan Washington, Washington, DC (June 2021)

 

“Engaging Evangelical Christians in Interfaith Dialogue” at the Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom National Conference, Doylestown, PA (November 2019)

 

“Common-sense Idioms in a Shared Environment: Why do Salafis in America sound so much like Evangelical Christians?” at the North American Association of Islamic and Muslim Studies, Boston, MA (September 2019)

 

“White Supremacy, Christian Theology, and the Rising Violence against Jews and Muslims” for Hadassah of Greater Baltimore (May 2019)

 

“Evangelical Christianity, American Politics, and the State of Israel” for the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation – Interfaith Institute (March 2019)

Select Publications and Presentations

Common-sense Idioms in a Shared Environment: Why do Salafis in America sound so much like Evangelical Christians?

Presentation at the 48th Annual Conference of the North American Association of Islamic and Muslim Studies.

READ MORE

A Cautionary Tale for Interreligious Studies from Comparative Fundamentalism: Who is at the Table?

Article in the Journal of Interreligious Studies.

READ MORE

Dabru Emet’s Imagined Future: Doing Eschatology with an Interreligious Sensitivity

Article published in American Religion.

READ MORE